Stocks

Stocks are the foundation for all of our soups and sauces. A stock is a concentration of flavors

withdrawn from a combination of bones and vegetables. In the case of vegetable stock, only

vegetables. There is no set recipe for a stock however there are some common elements used.

Most stocks use: celery, carrots, onions known as mirepoix. Fish stocks don't use carrot or

onion because of the delicate flavor of seafood, but may use shallots, and white wine. The

following are some guidelines for stocks.

 

4 reasons why you should make your own stock?

1. You can control what is in your stock,

2. No chemicals or additives,

3. Seasoned precisely how you want it.

4. Get the most out of something you already have in your house.

 

Click on: Poultry, Beef, Veal, Fish, Lobster, Vegetable

Clear Poultry Stock:

1 ea. chicken bones

1 ea. carrot, cut into large chunks

1/2 spanish onion, peeled, cut in chunks

2 ribs celery, cut in chunks

1/2 cup chardonnay (optional)

 

1. Place in 2 gallon stock pot,

2. Cover with 6 quarts of water, bring to boil, reduce to simmer, simmer 2.5 hours

3. Skim any impurities floating on the surface during the simmering time

4. Remove from heat, strain into a pot large enough to hold 3 to 4 quarts.

5. Clean any edible meat off bones and set aside

6. Cool down stock, place pot in sink with water that reaches half way up the pot, add

ice to drop temperature of water as cold as possible. Ideally you want to get

stock down to 70 degrees in 2 hours and down to under 40 in a 4 additional

hours.

7. Refrigerate or freeze until ready to use.

 

Use fresh chicken stock in 5 days, frozen in 4 months.

 

Variations: use bones from a roasted chicken, us only leafs, skin and peels from celery,

carrots, and onion. Use Turkey, Duck, Goose, Squab, Quail.

 

For larger birds or more smaller ones use more carrots, celery, onions.

For more concentrated flavor after straining the bones and vegetables,

return to stove and reduce to desired flavor.

 

 

Beef Stock:

2 to 5 lbs. of Beef bones

Roast bones; at 450 degrees for one hour, add hot bones to cold

water. (not crucial but helpful in shocking the bones to release

the extraction process)

2 ea. carrots, peeled, cut in chunks (peelings of 6 carrots)

2 ea. peels of spanish onion,

3 ea. ribs of celery, cut in chunks, (leaves of 1 bunch celery)

 

1. place in 2 gallon stock pot

2. cover with 6 quarts of water,bring to boil, reduce to simmer, simmer 3.5 hours

3. skim any impurities, floating on the surface during the simmering process

4. strain remaining liquid from pot into a 2 quart pot

5. Cool down stock, place pot in sink with water that reaches half way up the pot, add

ice to drop temperature of water as cold as possible. Ideally you want to get

stock down to 70 degrees in 2 hours and down to under 40 in a 4 additional

hours.

6. Refrigerate or freeze until ready to use.

 

Use fresh beef stock in 7 days, frozen 8 months.

 

Variations: use bones from steaks and roasts that you already prepared meals with

For more concentrated flavor after straining the bones and vegetables, return to

stove and reduce to desired flavor.

 

 

Veal Stock:

2 to 5 lbs. of Veal bones

Roast bones; unless they have already been roasted, add hot

bones to cold water. (not crucial but helpful in shocking the

bones to release the extraction process)

2 ea. carrots, peeled, cut in chunks (peelings of 6 carrots)

2 ea. peels of spanish onion,

3 ea. ribs of celery, cut in chunks, (leaves of 1 bunch celery)

3 oz. tomato paste, rub on veal bones prior to roasting, at 450 degrees, for 1

hour

 

1. place in 2 gallon stock pot

2. cover with 6 quarts of water,bring to boil, reduce to simmer, simmer 3.5 hours

3. skim any impurities, floating on the surface during the simmering process

4. strain remaining liquid from pot into a 2 quart pot

5. Cool down stock, place pot in sink with water that reaches half way up the pot, add

ice to drop temperature of water as cold as possible. Ideally you want to get

stock down to 70 degrees in 2 hours and down to under 40 in a 4 additional

hours.

6. Refrigerate or freeze until ready to use.

 

Use veal stock within 4 days fresh, frozen 6 months.

 

Variations: use bones from steaks and roasts that you already prepared meals with

For more concentrated flavor after straining the bones and vegetables, return to stove

and reduce to desired flavor.

Fish Stock or fume is mild because white mild fish is used, because oily fishes do

not make good stocks. It is important that you don't boil the stock, due to the

fragility of the fish. You shouldn't use onions or carrots because they will overtake

the fish flavor.

Fish Fume:

1/2 lb. of fish bones, washed in cold water

1/3 bunch leeks, washed, quartered

2 ribs celery, cut in chunks, (leaves of 1 bunch celery)

1/2 cup chardonnay or mild white wine

 

1. place in stock pot and cover with 3 quarts of cold water

2. bring to simmer only, and reduce to low heat.

3. skim any impurities, floating on the surface during the simmering process

4. your stock should be done in 1 hour

5. strain remaining liquid from pot into a 3 quart pot, or large enough to hold it.

6. cool down stock, place pot in sink with water that reaches half way up the pot, add

ice to drop temperature of water as cold as possible. Ideally you want to get

stock down to 70 degrees in 2 hours and down to under 40 in a 4 additional

hours.

7. refrigerate, or freeze until used.

 

Use fish fume within 3 days fresh, frozen 3 months.

Lobster Stock:

4 lobster bodies and shells (meat previously removed)

2 X 1/2'd tomatoes (or 2 oz. tomato paste)

1 cup mushroom pieces (optional)

2 ribs celery cut in chunks (leaves of 1 bunch celery)

1/2 cup sherry or brandy

 

1. sautee lobster bodies in stock pot, add vegetables, brown all

2. add sherry or brandy

3. add 6 quarts of water, (if you have recently boiled lobsters you could reserve the

broth from cooking them and add it here. Make sure you cool the broth

from cooking the lobsters appropriately until you make this stock.)

4. simmer about 1.5 hours

5. strain remaining liquid from pot into a 3 quart pot, or large enough to hold it.

6. cool down stock, place pot in sink with water that reaches half way up the pot, add

ice to drop temperature of water as cold as possible. Ideally you want to get

stock down to 70 degrees in 2 hours and down to under 40 in a 4 additional

hours.

7. refrigerate, or freeze until used.

 

Use fresh in 3 days, or frozen 3 months.

 

Vegetable Stock

2 onions, quartered

2 potatoes washed, cut into chunks

3 carrots, washed, cut into chunks

1 apple 1/4'd or 1 cup peas,

2 bay leaves

peppercorns

 

1. place in pot, cover with 6 quarts of water, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer.

2. reduce by 1/2, about 2 hours.

3. strain remaining liquid from pot into a 3 quart pot, or large enough to hold it.

4. cool down stock, place pot in sink with water that reaches half way up the pot, add

ice to drop temperature of water as cold as possible. Ideally you want to get

stock down to 70 degrees in 2 hours and down to under 40 in a 4 additional

hours.

5. refrigerate, or freeze until used.

 

Use fresh 5 days, or frozen 6 months.

 

Variations: winter squashes, small amounts of tomato, garlic, green part of leek, sweet

potato, scallion, herbs.