Roasting Charts - The Chef's Cooking School

Roasting Charts

Poultry, Roasting Charts

How to Use these roasting charts:

Follow these guidelines and utilize a thermometer to gauge the internal temperature of the meat. Aim for the middle times from the charts, then adjust according to your thermometer readings.

This time will act as a baseline using your equipment, note the weather as well. There are variables such as: the accurate temperature of the equipment and thermometers.  This can be affected by the room temperature and the humidity. This is why the charts should be used along with a good thermometer.  Cooking times should be adjusted and monitored based on the guideline and comparing how it is to your readings of an accurate thermometer.  Ex. if in 30 minutes the chart says you should be at 90 degrees (approx) and you are at 120 then you should adjust the final cooking times based on your progress.

Searing: Poultry is different then beef. When doing a whole chicken or turkey, you can start your oven at 425 - 450 for 15 to 35 minutes when you start cooking, then reduce the temperature. This would act as searing for poultry.

Another method would be reversed, you cook covered then 20 - 45 minutes before, uncover and brown.

Poultry

Cut

of meat

Temperature

Time P/lb

Convention

Oven

Time p/lb

Convection

Oven

Whole Chicken

Unstuffed

325 - 350

13 - 17 minutes

11 - 14minutes

Stuffed Chicken

325 - 350

15 - 22 minutes

10 - 17 minutes

Unstuffed Turkey

325 - 350

15 - 22 minutes

10 - 17 minutes

Stuffed Turkey

325 - 350

18 - 30 minutes

15 - 22 minutes

Poultry, particularly chicken and turkey need to be cooked to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit, to kill salmonella bacteria.

A Note From the Chef:

"Carry over cooking" is a term in cooking that starts when a roast comes out of the oven. The internal temperature

of the roast continues to rise until it peaks usually about 20 minutes. The internal temperature can rise as much as 10 degrees. When cooking a roast you should consider the carry over cooking. If you over cook your roast to begin with carry overcooking will really over cook your product.

You want to cook to the correct temperature, then let your roast rest for 20 minutes, this will allow the juices relax. They will not rush out of the meat when you slice into it.

Pork and Ham Roasting Charts

Searing:Roasts should be seared by brushing with olive oil, and at minimal salt and pepper for seasoning. Start by heating a skillet pan to high heat and place the meat in the pan to a caramel color on each side. Searing can be done ahead and then just before cooking pull your meat out of the refrigeration and temper for ½ hour before cooking.

Ham doesn't need to be seared.

Pork

&

Ham

Cut

of meat

Temperature

Desired

Doneness

Time P/lb

Convention

Oven

Time p/lb

Convection

Oven

Pork Tenderloin

325 - 350

Medium

17 - 25 minutes

12 -18 minutes

Pork Loin

325 - 350

Medium

13 - 17 minutes

10 - 15 minutes

Pork Rib Roast

325 - 350

Medium

18 - 22 minutes

15 - 20 minutes

325 - 350

Medium

7 - 9 minutes

5 - 8 minutes

Ham

Boneless

325 - 350

Medium

6 - 8 minutes

5 - 7minutes

Ham

Bone in

325 - 350

Medium

10 - 11 minutes

8 - 9 minutes

Ham: is most often smoked for our use. This means that the ham is cooked already when we get it. Smoked ham only needs to be heated.

Note From the Chef: Carry over cooking is a term in cooking that starts when a roast comes out of the oven. The internal temperature of the roast continues to rise until it peaks usually about 20 minutes. The internal temperature can rise as much as 10 degrees or so. When cooking a roast you should consider the carry over cooking. If you over cook to begin with carry over cooking will really over cook your product. By letting your roast rest for 20 minutes will allow the juices relax, and they will not rush out of the meat when you slice into it.

Beef, Roasting Charts

Searing: Roasts should be seared by brushing with olive oil, and at minimal salt and pepper for seasoning. Start by heating a skillet pan to high heat and place the meat in the pan to a caramel color on each side. Searing can be done ahead and then just before cooking pull your meat out of the refrigeration and temper for ½ hour before cooking.

Beef

&

Lamb

Cut

of meat

Temperature

Desired

Doneness

Time P/lb

Convention

Oven

Time p/lb

Convection

Oven

Top of the

round

325 - 350

Medium

9 - 11 minutes

7 - 9 minutes

Eye of the

Round

325 - 350

Medium

15 - 20 minutes

12 - 15 minutes

Sirloin

325 - 350

Medium

6 - 7 minutes

4 - 5 minutes

Tenderloin

325 - 350

Medium

7 - 9 minutes

5 - 8 minutes

Rib Eye

Boneless

(prime rib)

325 - 350

Medium

11 - 15 minutes

8 - 11 minutes

Rib Eye Bone In

325 - 350

Medium

12 - 16 minutes

9 - 12 minutes

Lamb Leg

Boneless

325 - 350

medium

10 - 13 minutes

9 - 11 minutes

Lamb Leg

Bone in

325 -350

medium

12 - 14 minutes

10 - 11 minutes

Temperature, color and firmness can all be used to identify the desired result for your meat. Here is a guideline, used along with the time guidelines above, that will help determine if your beef is done the way you like it.

135 degrees = Rare

Red Cool Center

Spongy Texture

rare steak

Rare Beef steak

140 degrees = Med Rare 

Dark Pink Warm Center

Soft Texture

medium Rare

Medium Rare

145 degrees = Medium

Pink Warm Center

 Tender Texture

Medium

Medium

150 degrees = Medium Well

Grey Warmer Center

Firm texture

Medium Well

Medium Well

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